The American Communities Project continues to conduct research and analysis of trends in U.S. society. Below are lists of reports and sortable tables available on data released so far. For access to a complete report, to view related news stories, or to view sortable lists or data, simply click on the links provided.

REPORTS

  • Resegregation in American Public Schools? Not in the 1990s. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, April 26, 2004.
    The trend toward lower levels of school segregation halted after 1990 but did not reverse; most gains made in the 1960s and 1970s have been protected. The report shows that purported evidence of resegregation is primarily due to the shifting racial composition of the school population, not to greater polarization across schools.

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  • The Continuing Legacy of the Brown Decision: Court Action and School Segregation, 1960-2000. John Logan and Deirdre Oakley, Lewis Mumford Center, January 26, 2004.
    Segregation in public elementary schools declined sharply between 1968 and 1990.  Surprisingly, the changes took place about equally in the South and in the rest of the country, and in school districts that were ordered to desegregate as well as those that were not.  This report emphasizes that most progress was made within school districts; growing gaps across districts limited the gains in the post-Brown period.

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  • Segregation in Neighborhoods and Schools: Impacts on Minority Children in the Boston Region. John Logan, Deirdre Oakley, and Jacob Stowell, Lewis Mumford Center, September 1, 2003.
    Nearly 30 years after the beginning of court-ordered busing in Boston, black and Hispanic children in the Boston metropolitan region are largely excluded from schools in the more affluent residential suburbs. This report describes residential patterns and their consequences for school segregation and school inequality using data from the 2000 census and 1999-2000 school year.

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  • How Race Counts for Hispanic Americans. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, July 14, 2003.
    There are nearly a million black Hispanics in the U.S., and they are more similar to non-Hispanic blacks than to other Hispanic racial groups. The fastest growing segment of the Hispanic community describes itself not as black or white, but simply as Hispanic. This report describes how race is counted among Hispanics, and shows that different Hispanic racial groups are very distinct in terms of socioeconomic status and residential patterns.

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  • America's Newcomers. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, June 18, 2003.
    The 2000 Census counted nearly 29 million immigrants living in metropolitan regions throughout the United States, up by 10 million since 1990. This report summarizes what has been learned up to now from Census 2000 about these American Newcomers.

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  • People and Politics in America's Big Cities. John Logan ( Lewis Mumford Center) and John Mollenkopf (Center for Urban Research, CUNY Graduate Center), May 15, 2003.
    There is a lag between changes in the racial and ethnic composition of cities and the representation of new groups in local politics. This study analyzes the cases of New York and Los Angeles to take a close look at this phenomenon. The study was prepared for a conference organized in New York City with the support of the Drum Major Institute, Metropolitan College, and The Century Foundation. NOTE: This report is a very large pdf file with many color illustrations.

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  • Black Diversity in Metropolitan America. John Logan and Glenn Deane, Lewis Mumford Center, February 17, 2003. (revised August 15, 2003).
    The black population is becoming increasingly diverse as a result of continued immigration from the Caribbean and Africa. The newer groups face similar levels of segregation from whites as do African Americans, despite very different social backgrounds.

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  • Technical Report: Comparability of the 2000 and 1990 Census Occupation Codes. Glenn Deane and Hyoungjin Shin, Lewis Mumford Center, November 19, 2002.
    This report describes a "crosswalk" for those occupations placed at the upper end of the occupational hierarchy in 1990: management, professional, and related occupations. Using this crosswalk, analysts will know which detailed occupation categories in 1990 and 2000 can be combined to create a consistent management/professional category. Without this reconfiguration, the percent change in this occupational classification is artificially inflated.

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  • Separate and Unequal: The Neighborhood Gap for Blacks and Hispanics in Metropolitan America. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, October 15, 2002.
    Persistent residential segregation still prevents many blacks and Hispanics from moving to better neighborhoods. In many metro areas, minorities with incomes over $60,000 live in less advantaged neighborhoods than whites earning under $30,000. This report summarizes national trends in income inequality and neighborhood disparities across groups, and compares the situation among the metro areas with the largest minority populations.

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  • The Muslim World in Metropolitan America. John Logan and Glenn Deane, Lewis Mumford Center, November 19, 2001. (revised October 11 2002, and August 15, 2003).
    There are 2.9 million Americans with roots in the majority-Muslim regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. This report describes this population, identifies the metropolitan regions where they are found in the largest numbers, and examines the kinds of neighborhoods where they live.

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  • The Suburban Advantage. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, June 24, 2002.
    New census data show that the economic gap between cities and suburbs continues to be unyielding. Suburbs outpaced cities on eight indicators of prosperity in the majority of metropolitan areas. This occurred in some surprising places like Phoenix, where the central city has been on a par with its suburbs in 1990.

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  • Regional Divisions Dampen '90s Prosperity: New Census Data Show Economic Gains Vary by Region. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, June 5, 2002.
    Despite overall increases in incomes and a small decline in poverty, the prosperity of the 90's was not widely shared, particularly in the Northeast and Southern California. The surprise is the rebound of the Rustbelt.

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  • Hispanic Populations and Their Residential Patterns in the Metropolis. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, May 8, 2002.
    What we call the Hispanic population in America is actually a mixture of many different groups. This report looks particularly at differences in the residential patterns of people from specific Hispanic national origins, analyzing trends in segregation and formation of distinctive Hispanic enclaves in the metropolis.

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  • Choosing Segregation: Racial Imbalance in American Public Schools, 1990-2000. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, January 18, 2002 (revised March 29, 2002).
    In many metropolitan regions, desegregation evident in the 1989-90 school year has given way to substantial increases of black-white segregation. New national data for 1999-2000 show that segregation from whites has edged upwards not only for black children, but also for Hispanic, and Asian children. Segregation places black and Hispanic children, on average, in schools where two-thirds of students are at or near the poverty line.

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  • From Many Shores: Asians in Census 2000. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, November 19, 2001.
    There are now as many as six distinct Asian national-origin groups with more than a million residents in the U.S. This report documents the very large differences in social background and location between the Chinese, Indians, Filipinos, and other major Asiangroups.

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  • Ethnic Diversity Grows, Neighborhood Integration Lags Behind. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, December 18,2001 (original version issued April 3, 2001).
    The 2000 Census shows that residential segregation, particularly between blacks and whites, remains high in cities and suburbs across the country. Despite growing ethnic diversity nationwide and a substantial shift of minorities from cities to suburbs, these groups have not gained access to largely white neighborhoods. Since 1980 there has been a modest decline in black-white segregation, particularly in metropolitan areas with small black populations; there has been no net change in segregation of the growing Hispanic and Asian minorities.

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  • Separating the Children. John Logan, Deirdre Oakley, Polly Smith, Jacob Stowell, and Brian Stults, Lewis Mumford Center, December 28, 2001 (original version posted May 6, 2001).
    The 2000 Census shows that America's children are living in neighborhoods separated by race and ethnicity, experiencing higher segregation than does the population of all ages. Segregation trends mirror those of the total population -- with a modest decrease in the very high segregation of black children, and no change for Hispanics and Asians. Hispanic children are increasingly growing up in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods. In fact, children of all groups are being raised in environments where their own group's size is inflated, and where they are under-exposed to children of other racial and ethnic backgrounds.

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  • The New Ethnic Enclaves in America's Suburbs. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, July 9, 2001.
    America's suburbs are being radically transformed growth of their minority population. This report analyzes suburbanization by African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians in all metro areas between 1990 and 2000, focusing on the formation and stengthening of ethnic enclaves in many large suburban regions.

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  • The New Latinos: Who They Are, Where They Are. John Logan, Lewis Mumford Center, September 10, 2001.
    The fastest growing Hispanic groups in the U.S. are people from the Dominican Republic, Central America, and South America. Many were misclassified as Other Hispanic in Census 2000. The Mumford Center offers adjusted counts showing that there are now over 1 million Dominicans and Salvadorans in the country. This report compares social and economic characteristics of the many Hispanic national-origin groups and shows in which states and metro areas they are located

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SORTABLE LISTS

Sortable lists are provided for population counts and segregation scores for the 331 metropolitan areas in the 2000 Census. Ethnic/racial group populations and Dissimilarity Indices are viewable by clicking on the links below:

  • Sortable List for Whole Population. This provides a list of population totals, the breakdown of population by white, black, Hispanic, and Asian, and rankings by metropolitan area.
  • Sortable List for Children Population. This provides a list of population totals among children, the breakdown of population by white, black, Hispanic, and Asian, and rankings by metropolitan area.