DIVERSITY WITHIN DIVERSITY

As the United States becomes more diverse through the rapid growth of Latino and Asian populations, there is also increasing diversity within these large categories. Social scientists have always been aware of this diversity: Chinese and Koreans speak different languages and have different cultures and histories, and although Spanish language is a common bond for many Hispanics there are great differences between Mexicans and Puerto Ricans.

An important question is to what extent  "pan-ethnic"  identifications are being created in the U.S. that overcome these ethnic boundaries. These web pages provide information on what we will refer to as “national origin” groups among Hispanics and Asians for the period 1990-2010:

  • What is their size and growth in specific metropolitan regions?
  • How segregated are they from non-Hispanic whites and how has this changed over time?
  • What kinds of neighborhoods do they live in? Are “separate” neighborhoods also “unequal”? Click here for more details about data sources and measures.

An overview report on Hispanic groups is available here.

To view these pages, first CHOOSE A METROPOLITAN REGION OR A REGION :

The Census Bureau uses a standard set of definitions of the area included in each "metropolitan statistical area" (MSA) or "metropolitan division,” which is a subdivision of a highly populated MSA, such as the New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA MSA.

“Select a Metropolitan Region” lists all MSAs and Metropolitan Divisions alphabetically.
"Select a Metro Division” lists the 11 subdivided MSAs and their Metropolitan Divisions.



Next, CHOOSE A MAJOR RACIAL/ETHNIC GROUP:


 


© Spatial Structures in the Social Sciences, Brown University